KINDNESS ISN’T A LOST ART FORM

29 Sep KINDNESS ISN’T A LOST ART FORM

#Loveconnects is my mission. In addition to my hashtag, it is my goal, my purpose, and my new mantra. As I build my world more securely within the concept of love, I am blessed to see it more and experience the power of this most simple phrase.
On the Road to Values, I meet a lot of amazing people. The people that I meet at my seminars, lectures, schools, etc. are marvelous. I also realize that we are meeting in a bubble that requires a level or decorum and presupposes kindness. I would not expect someone to be unpleasant at a book signing or a talk on love. It could happen, but it isn’t likely.
There is another kind of person that I meet, they are the anonymous people who spread seeds of love for no other reason except that it’s the right thing to do. This bring me to my story of Janine and Jim. This past Labor Day weekend, my friend and I decided to head down to the beach to enjoy what Chicagoans define as the “last weekend of summer.” We stopped at Oak Street Beach to enjoy the sunshine, the gentle whooshing of the water, great music, and cold beverage.
There weren’t any seats available, but I manage to snag a table that had just been deserted by its previous occupants. As my friend ordered, I sat and waited at the table to do what most people these days do, catch up on emails. As I sat there, a lovely man walked up to ask if he could join me with his girlfriend. Naturally, I said yes, as my friend and I had no need to commandeer an entire table and four chairs. So they sat and we made some small talk about my dog Lia who was trying to climb over the table to enthusiastically greet them.
My friend finally arrived and we sat and chatted. A short time later, a plate of nachos and guacamole arrived at our table for Jim and Janine. They offered us some to extend a thank you for allowing us to share the table. We both respectfully declined as we had just eaten not too much earlier. From time to time, we all chatted, but for the most part our conversations were separate. Then a short time later, another of the same dish arrived. Jim had ordered it for us as a thank you for sharing the table with them. It was a very generous and lovely gesture on his part in reciprocation for something as simple as sharing a table.
Later when I thought about it, I realized that often times, we are all too willing to offer people our extra chairs. But how often do we ask complete strangers to join our space? This is a far more common practice in Europe. Here in the States, it is less so as we tend to attach to our personal space and what we “conquer” (in this case the table). Some of us have a more difficult time letting go of the stuff and letting in the experience. But the question I have is, “How hard is it to open up just a little bit further to let more people in?” It’s not. In my case, by saying “yes” I got to experience two fantastic people, good conversation, and a plate of nachos. But it isn’t about saying, “yes” to get something. It is about saying yes to the idea that love connects us all. So the next time you are out, share your space, open your heart, and see what kind of “love connection” you can make.

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